•  Old timers may recall the popular show, Name That Tune from the  1950's (and then again in the 1970's and 1980's), in which competitors attempted to identify a melody based on a clue and just a few notes from the song. MP3 players and playlists make it easy to play a simple, fun version of this game, which has been the highlight of many a Christmas Game. First, decide what songs your family members all might be somewhat familiar with with, but won't necessarily be able to have right at the...

  • Today we feature a Games card - Card 44, from Deck 2 - The Minister's Cat. If you don't know how to play, this fun video clip from the 1970 musical "Scrooge" will tell you everything you need to know. The Christmas Game's blank cards let you include any activities you like, but we included The Minister's Cat because we think that reviving parlor games from a prior century is a great way to reclaim our tradition of spending joyful time together at Christmas without spending money. We humans used to...

  • Most teenagers and adults have surprisingly strong attachments to one or  more children's books that they connected with early in life. It might be perennial favorites like Go Dog Go! or Are You My Mother?, an oft-read fairy tale, something by Dr. Seuss, a favorite collection of tongue-twisters, more modern classics like Each Peach Pear Plum, or something brilliant-but-little-known, like (in my family) Blumpoe the Grumpo meets Arnold the Cat.  Gather some wonderful children's literature from storage or from the library, or borrow from a friend. Then have a box...

  • The very first card category we introduced was Games. That was a good choice, given the history of Christmas. Although there is ongoing cultural friction about whether Christmas should be secular or religious, festive or solemn, the tradition of playing games at Christmas goes back centuries. Before the age of electricity, families and friends drawn together for the celebration, often huddled indoors due to cold weather or worse, would of course be drawn to diversions before or after a feast. In the 21st century we have more options. On Christmas...

  • The Memory Book may be the best reason to play The Christmas Game. In the Memory Book, you'll record for each player their likes, dislikes, opinions, and goals. Each year you play The Christmas Game, your Memory Book grows more interesting and more valuable. Eventually, looking back through the Memory Book can be surprising, fascinating, and entertaining, and guessing how players answered the same question in years past (especially when answered many years past) can become a game in itself. This week's featured card, Recommended Books (Deck 1, Card 17),...

  • Many Kindness Cards in The Christmas Game focus on ways to help others. But it is just important to acknowledge when others have been kind to us. Card 63 (Deck 2) directs all players to write a thank you note to someone who did something nice for them this month. One way to generally improve your mood is to spend some a few moments each day thinking of the good things that have happened to you, and of the nice things people have done for you. And one way to...

  • The Buzz About The Christmas Game includes this comment from a fan in Hillsboro, Ohio: "What's different about this game is that it encourages kindness." The Christmas Game is played with cards, and involves suspense, and is a lot of fun -- but it is different from what we think of as a "game" in the traditional sense, because it is not competitive, and everyone wins.  The Christmas Game's primary purpose is to help your family live the Christmas values you care about most. So the Christmas Game does encourage...