• Amateur sleuths of all ages enjoy a secret code. For families that enjoy a challenge, breaking the code is its own reward. For families more used to extrinsic motivation, you can condition the opening of the next present on the breaking of the code, with all family members working together on the solution. Once you start making and breaking secret codes, the habit can be addicting. You may find yourself leaving encoded messages for other family members in obvious places such as mirrors and pillows, or to be discovered only...

  • A Book of Super Cool Tongue Twisters, is a family self-publishing project that is the opposite of most tongue twister books. Instead of being a book written by adults for children, it seems more like a book written by children for adults. There are no child-oriented illustrations that attempt to make sense of the strange constructions or to make interesting to young children a collection of words that lacks story or sense. Instead, the book gets right down to business, presenting sixty verses on sixty pages. Such a thick collection...

  • Illustrator Seymour Chwast collects 25 short and easy tongue twisters targeting younger children. An introductory page notes, "The tongue twister is a phrase or sentence that is difficult to articulate because of a sequence of similar sounds. They should be spoken and repeated several times, quickly, without a mistake. As a form of speech therapy, it helps in the treatment of some speech defects." This book may indeed by intended as much for therapeutic purposes as for entertainment. Each verse is written in giant black letters on a white background,...

  • Charles Keller's book Tongue Twisters offers 44 chances to tie your tongue. Some of the rhymes are familiar traditional verses, like Peter Piper, Wood Chuck, and Betty's Butter. Others are mere alliterations, without much tongue twisting potential, like, "Terrified tomcats in the tops of tall trees." This collection is unusual in that it contains a large number of exceedingly short entries, such as "This is a zither." Like Six Sheep Sip Thick Shakes, the Keller book offers illustrations in the children's style. Sometimes the pictures are asked do a lot...

  • Brian Cleary's Six Sheep Sip Thick Shakes is built more like a children's board book than a book of tongue twisters. With one short rhyme per page, and each page covered with colorful whimsical drawings of animals, it's easy to imagine hoisting a pre-schooler onto your lap and reading this book. But it's not clear how much fun the pre-schooler would have. The design of this book screams young children, but the text is often distinctly adult. It's hard to know what a very young child would make of, "She...

  • Fifteen years after penning the tongue twister masterpiece Fox in Socks, Dr. Seuss in 1979 tried his hand again at twisting tongues with Oh Say Can You Say. Oh Say Can You Say trades the story format of Fox in Socks for a collection of 20+ tongue-twisting vignettes, introducing bizarre scenarios with whimsical illustrations that make you almost believe the scenarios. Oh Say Can You Say is still our second-favorite tongue twister book, because its high-points are very good. But more often than not the verbal structures strain to make...

  • Game Card 8 challenges players to try a tongue twister. Our favorite tongue twister book is the Dr. Seuss classic Fox in Socks, which, although fifty ¬†years old, has yet to be topped, or even approached. The plot of Fox in Socks is simply a rhyming dialogue between Mr. Fox and Mr. Knox, in which Fox attempts to coax Knox into saying increasingly difficult and complicated rhymes, climaxing with the infamous Tweedle Beetle Battle, after which Knox finally extracts his revenge. The book's first page warns, "Take it slowly -...