How to Play Guggenheim

| Posted in Games, How to Play | | No Comments

Guggenheim is a simple but confounding game. A commercial version is sold under the name "Scattergories." Some families might wish to simply play Scattergories when Card 114 is drawn. But for those who would make their own game using a pen, paper, and timer, read on.

The object of the game is to think of things that begin with a particular letter and fall into a particular category -- for example, an animal that begins with G might be a giraffe; a sport that begins with G might be golf; a movie star beginning with G might be Cary Grant.

Each round of Guggenheim involves five letters and five categories.

Each player should have an identical play sheet that has five categories across the top, and five letters down the side.  It is traditional to use a five-letter word in the left-column, but the letters might also be randomly selected.

All players have ten minutes to try to fill in the twenty-five boxes with an example of each category that starts with the designated letter.  For example, a partially filled out sheet might look like this:

After ten minutes are up, all players stop writing and compare what they wrote in the boxes.  One point is scored for each entry that no other player wrote. For example, for an animal beginning with B, if one player wrote Baboon, one wrote Bonobo, and another wrote Bongo, each player would receive one point. But if two players wrote Baboon and one wrote Bongo, the two players who wrote Baboon would receive zero points, but the player who wrote Bongo would receive one point.

If there is any question as to whether an entry properly fits into a category -- for example, whether an isotope like Deuterium counts as an "element" -- the players will vote.

For an easier game, choose broader categories, such as Food instead of Fruit, and Celebrities instead of Movie Stars.  Some categories may give a distinct advantage to younger players (e.g., Candy, Toys, Cartoon Characters, Video Games, Pokemon). Other categories may be quite challenging (Emperors, Statues, Philosophers, Paintings, Ocean Fish).

Below are some categories you might consider using, or invent your own:

Athletes

Artists

Authors

Astronauts

Biblical Characters

Birds

Body Parts

Breakfast Food

Building Materials

Cars

Children's Books

Cities

Clothing

College Majors

Colors

Countries

Desserts

Famous Women

Farm animals

Flavors

Flowers

Food

Found in a swamp

Four-letter words

Furniture

Girls' Names

Historical Figures

Ice cream flavors

Languages

Lakes

Medicines

Movies

Mythological Characters

Novels

Parts of a car

Plants

Politicans

Restaurants

Scary things

Spices

Sports Teams

Stars, planets & constellations

Things in the ocean

Things that are green

Things with corners

Tools

Trees

Type of dog or cat

Vacation desinations

Words with a double-letter

Zoo animals

No Comments

Leave a comment




Comments have to be approved before showing up..